First Attempts with Holga 120N, Horseman Accordion & Rusty Rollbox

Preface: About a month ago, I borrowed a Holga 120N from my roommate on a whim. The assignment for my photo class was to emulate a famous photographer, and the guy I chose had a great set of Holga pictures on his website. I rushed to the local photo store and bought two rolls of black and white 120 film. I asked the clerk, “So, is this film in a canister like 35mm?” The old man behind me chuckled at my inexperience. They patiently explained how 120 worked, and I was instantly fascinated.

Last weekend after Thanksgiving, I decided to pick at the antique cameras my family had acquired over the years and had been sitting on a bookshelf collecting dust. For the longest time, I just assumed that the film for those cameras didn’t exist. But when I inspected them, lo and behold, most of them took 120. The ones that didn’t could be easily modified to fit 120 or 35mm. So I went on a shoot near the airport in Las Vegas. Admittedly, these frames are far from perfect, and I seriously screwed up the Horseman pictures.

Holga:

6

2

4

Rusty Rollbox:

6

2

Horseman:

2_e

And here is a (crappy) picture of the antique cameras I’m starting to shoot with:

Horseman (left), Rollbox (center), and Starflex Brownie (right), which failed on this shoot for a number of reasons.

Horseman (left), Rollbox (center), and Starflex Brownie (right), which failed on this shoot for a number of reasons.

About The Author

Kyle Anderson
I'm a media and IT professional and JavaScript developer who worked most recently as an Associate Broadcast IT Engineer (Tier II) for CNN in Atlanta. One of my life-long goals is to help bridge data divides - missing connections between software systems and data stores - promoting inter-system communication and automation. Many of the projects described here reflect this goal in some way or another.